Used car buying tips

by: Steve Gillman

 

Some of these used car buying tips won’t be new to you. Often the trick is just to apply what you already know. On the other hand, when it comes to expensive areas of life like buying a car, one new thing learned can save you hundreds of dollars. Try some of the following.

Used Car Buying Tips1. Make a low offer. Okay, you knew this one. A trick you may not have used, though, is to make a low offer, and then leave your phone number with the seller. Time has a way of making sellers desperate, especially after you just helped convince them that they are asking too much.

2. Be careful with car price guides. Use the “blue book” etc, but try not to pay more than wholesale. I can’t think of many times when people I know have paid more than “bluebook,” so these “average” sales prices are doubtful.

3. Talk to people. This is one of the simplest and effective used car buying tips. Just let friends, family and others know you’re looking for a car. Quite often people would be happy to avoid the whole process of advertising and showing their car if they could just get rid of it by giving a good deal to a friend.

4. Check out the engine. Have a mechanic look at the car, and tell you what it’s likely to need in the next year or so. Then make a list, so the seller can see in writing why you are offering less than he wants.

5. Auctions. See if there is a public auction in your area. If not, maybe you can go with a dealer friend and give him a $100 to buy a car for you.

6. www.carfax.com. It’s around $25 to run vehicle background checks for a month – long enough to find your next car. They’ll show the chain of title, accident reports for the car, and even safety and reliability scores for that model.

7. “Ugly” cars. Watch for cars that sit on the lot for months. Dealers will often sell these “ugly ducklings” at a loss just to move them. Again, you may want to leave your phone number with a low offer.

8. Rental company cars. They are sold fairly cheap when they get the new ones in. Buy at bluebook wholesale or less, because they have had many different drivers, so they’ve more wear than normal.

9. Repos. Credit unions and some small banks do their own selling of repossessed cars. You usually bid on paper, maybe with a $50 deposit, and then get your $50 back if you’re not the winning bidder. If they don’t sell their own repossessions, ask where they are sold.

10. Consider gas mileage. High mileage may be better, but maybe a car that costs $500 less will use only $400 more gas in the two years you expect to own it. Do the math.

Use the tips here the next time you are shopping for a used car. Meanwhile, why not learn a few negotiating strategies. This helps in many areas of life, and is the most important of these used car buying tips.

The blue book of used cars

sell used carIf you are planning to sell your used car to a vehicle dealer, you should be aware of the basic process in determining the worth of your car. This would ensure you would not be scammed and taken for granted by car dealer experts.

* What is the Blue Book value?

The Blue Book value is a basic term used in the car-buying business. It means the worth or cost of a vehicle. This vital book determines the price of what dealers are willing to pay for a used car.

* Where could you find the Blue Book value?

There are several resources responsible for determining the value of your car. The two most popular is the Kelley Blue Book and the N.A.D.A. Appraisal Guides.

The Kelley Blue Book, which invented the term Blue Book, is a principal source for determining the loan value on used cars. It has been providing information for 75 years.

The N.A.D.A. Appraisal Guides, which was established in 1933, is another helpful Blue Book that provides car buyers to review the car’s worth.

* How does the Blue Book determine the value of a used car?

The Blue Book calculates the value of your car based on the make, the model and year. The book also considers factors such as conditions of the used-cars, mileage and other options. The majority of the popular Blue Books are free for public use in their respective web sites. They provide user-friendly worksheets to help determine the appropriate value of a used car. Being aware of the Blue Book value of your car would help you search for a fair deal.

* How do you determine the amount you wish to spend on buying a use car?

If you’re planning to buy a used car, you should determine how much money you are willing to spend. Consider the additional expenses such as the tags when applying for a car loan, extra tax, and purchasing of the car title.

* How does the Blue Book determine the final values?

Many organizations and individuals make use of the Blue Book. Car auctions, private owners, rentals and fleets, franchised and independent dealers all use the Blue Book to determine the final value.

Used car values are determined by a respectable editorial process. Each process starts with an analysis of the collected data which include the current economic conditions, the historical trends, seasonality, location and industry developments. The final value reflects the most current representation of the changing car marketplace.

Be a wise used-car shopper and avoid bad deals and investments. Check with the Blue Book to find helpful guidelines in your used-car purchase
Article Source: http://www.articleset.com

About The Author

Gregory Ashton, your resident automobile enthusiast, bringing to you over 20 years of vehicular passion, and expertise; presents for your approval his insider secrets on selecting, buying, and maintianing the car that is ideal for you.